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strix owl mythology

29. november, 2020

Mai Ajánlat

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[2] The first Latin allusion is in Plautus's Pseudolus,[3] dated to 191 BC, in which a cook, describing the cuisine of his inferiors, compares its action to that of the striges—i.e., disemboweling a hapless victim. Owls are birds from the order Strigiformes / ˈ s t r ɪ dʒ ɪ f ɔːr m iː z /, which includes over 200 species of mostly solitary and nocturnal birds of prey typified by an upright stance, a large, broad head, binocular vision, binaural hearing, sharp talons, and feathers adapted for silent flight. The strix (plural striges or strixes), in the mythology of classical antiquity, was a bird of ill omen, the product of metamorphosis, that fed on human flesh and blood. [29] Medea's rejuvenating concoction which she boiled in a cauldron used a long list of ingredients, including the strix's wings. striges or strixes), in the Ancient Roman and Greek legends was a bird of ill omen, product of metamorphosis, that fed on human flesh and blood. late 2nd century) glossed as "women who practice witchcraft" "(maleficis mulieribus)" or "flying women" ("witches" by transference)[31][32], There are striges, vultures, and bubo owls which cry in the marshes in Hades, by the edge of Tartarus[33] according to Seneca the Younger's tragedy Hercules Furens. The term ‘Strix, is actually Latin for “screecher,” and in Roman it is means “owl.”. Strix (pl. But one paper suggests guilt by association with her sons,[13] and seeks to reconstruct an ancient Greek belief in the man-eating strīx dating back to this age (4th century BC). [4][9][8], In the case of Ovid's striges, they threatened to do more harm than that. [21] A ritual to keep the striges away from the newborn prince was subsequently performed by the nymph Cranae (or goddess Carna), who owned a wand of whitethorn, (spina) given to her by Janus, which could expel evil from all doors. The name, in Greek, means "owl".[1]. [2] Elsewhere, it is described as being dark-colored. [1] This is the only thorough description of the strix in Classical literature. They were said to disembowel an infant and feed on its blood. Ovid tells the story of striges attacking the legendary king Procas in his cradle, and how they were warded off with arbutus and placated with the meat of pigs, as an explanation for the custom of eating beans and bacon on the Kalends of June.[4]. Their eyes are yellow and round, without pupils. They also have wings, usually red, and four black legs, all with clawed feet. [40] He wrote that they sometimes had corporeal bodies and wore clothing, and sometimes appeared as spirits.[41]. In Greek mythology, the owl was associated with the wise goddess Athena. The earliest recorded tale of the strix is from the lost Ornithologia of the Greek author Boios, which is partially preserved in Antoninus Liberalis's Metamorphoses. Strix is a creature from Ancient Roman mythology that is often described as a nocturnal bird, such as an owl. https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Strix_(mythology)&oldid=982150428, Metamorphoses into birds in Greek mythology, Articles with unsourced statements from March 2014, Articles with unsourced statements from January 2014, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, This page was last edited on 6 October 2020, at 12:58. [i][1][22], Petronius's novel Satyricon (late 1st century AD) includes a tale told by the character Trimalchio, describing the striges that snatched away the body of a boy who had already died, substituting it with a straw doll. [7], The strix in later folklore was a bird which squirted milk upon the lips of (human) infants. Listen to the story again, and you'll hear four different owls. In Romanian, strigăt means 'scream',[8] strigoaică is the name of the Romanian feminine vampire,[9] and strigoi is the Romanian male vampire. Linnaeus named the biological genus of earred owls Strix; historically, this genus was (erroneously) thought to extend to barn owls. Polyphonte became a strix "that cries by night, without food or drink, with head below and tips of feet above, a harbinger of war and civil strife to men". The Greeks believed an owl flying over a battlefield foretold victory, while in other cultures, owls were considered omens of death, prophets of doom. The Latin term striga in both name and sense as defined by Medieval lexicographers was in use throughout central and eastern Europe. [12], In this Greek myth, the ill-omened strīx herself did not perpetrate harm on humans. Strega (obviously derived from Latin striga) is the Italian term for witch, and in Romanian strigăt means 'scream',[42] strigoaică is the name of the Romanian feminine vampire,[43] and strigoi is the Romanian male vampire. [34] Also, according to the legend of Otus and Ephialtes, they were punished in Hades by being tied to a pillar with snakes, with a strix perched on that column. Their name was once used as a curse being the only other piece of information Pliny gives here. Strzyga And Witch Hunt [38] In the 7th–8th century John of Damascus equated the stiriges (Greek plural: Greek: στρίγγαι, Στρῦγγαι)[39] with the gelloudes (pl. [citation needed]. The owls heard in this story, in order, are the Barred Owl, … When the strix occasionally appeared in the church tower at night, this ominous bird heralded an imminent death to all who were within her sight.

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